Thursday, February 9, 2017

Allied Healthcare Applicants: Don’t Pass Up a Great Opportunity

Are you looking for a job in Allied Healthcare? Well, you’re in luck! Now is a good time to be job hunting in this particular field. Physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech language-pathologists, nurse practitioners, physician assistants and others are all still in high demand. Many small and large medical offices are seeking individuals with experience in Allied Healthcare in order to meet a growing demand. New grads are welcome in numerous places as well.

One thing applicants do need to watch out for, however, is unintentionally passing up on a great opportunity. It’s always nice to be wanted and sought after. You do have to be careful to not get overly-confident. Believe it or not, it’s not uncommon. We’ve seen applicants turn down extremely good positions in search of something better. When in fact what they wanted was right in front of their face. Sometimes a quick review of what’s most important to you, or little negotiation with a potential employer, is all it takes to get the last piece of the puzzle to fit.

Finding the Right Fit in the Healthcare Industry

If you’re currently looking for a new job, you know finding the right fit is not always an easy task. One company may have a job with the salary range you’re interested in, whereas another is closer to home and offers continuing education opportunities. So how do you decide?

Smiling dentist with patient

Start with clearly defining what matters most to you. Would you rather work in a smaller medical office or be part of a large team? Are you willing to commute or do you need to work close to home? Is career advancement and continuing education a deal-breaker? Does salary outweigh other advantages and would you be willing to negotiate? It is only once you know what you want can you begin to find the right fit for you.

Job Interview Checklist for Those Seeking Jobs in Allied Healthcare

Prior to going into a job interview in Allied Healthcare, go through this simple checklist. This will help you not only identify if you’re a good fit, but allow you to determine what aspects of the job are most important to you. You don’t want to waste either your time or that of a potential employer.

Review the job to determine:

  • Do you have experience in this type of position? For example, you may be applying for a job at a skilled nursing facility, whereas your experience lies in home health or outpatient.
  • Do you meet the qualifications necessary to fill the position? If the employer specifically asks for someone with 5+ years of experience, a new grad would probably be turned down point black.
  • Is the facility within a reasonable commute?
  • Is the offered salary within the range you want?
  • Does the company offer continuing education? How important is this to you?
  • Does the company seem to be expanding and have room for advancement?
  • Are you willing to negotiate on any aspects of the job, or would that just be compromising too much?

Should you need assistance with any aspect of your job search, the People Link is a professional recruitment service specializing in finding and placing qualified applicants with Allied Healthcare companies throughout the United States. To learn more about our services, please visit The People Link or call Mya at 888-773-0014 for a free, no-obligation consultation.

Tuesday, January 24, 2017

Hiring in Healthcare: Meeting an Urgent Demand

Despite the large number of people graduating with associate’s, bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in key fields of the healthcare industry, many employers are still finding themselves struggling to keep up with an urgent hiring demand for allied health professionals.

You may not realize it but, the healthcare industry is one of only a few industries where the demand for skilled professionals like Physical Therapists, Occupational Therapists and Speech Language Pathologists continues to steadily rise. In fact, jobs in the healthcare sector are rising at a much faster rate than the average for other occupations and fields. So, even with all these new professionals attaining degrees, numerous positions remain vacant. In addition, many of the healthcare professionals who have years of experience and extensive training will be approaching retirement age in the not-to-distant future. These positions, as soon as they become available, will also need to be filled.

So, how can you meet the urgent demand for experienced, skilled allied health professionals? How can you find the perfect fit for your clinic, office or medical facility? How can you replace an intrinsic part of your team without missing a beat?

What to Look for in a Healthcare Applicant

Not all applicants are alike, even when they have the same degrees and level of training. What you see on paper isn’t necessarily what you see in real life. For this reason, it is important you know what you are looking for in a healthcare applicant. Keeping these qualities in mind when conducting interviews can help you narrow your search and meet your demand:

  • Consider the long-term. Does this person strive for advancement opportunities? Is he or she interested in furthering skills through continued learning? Is professional growth important? Does the person have a strong commitment to his or her profession?
  • Is the applicant passionate about the job and ambitious? Does he or she have a real drive to help improve patient wellness, injury prevention and overall health promotion? Those who are passionate about their job and the company they work for tend to stay longer.
  • Is the individual a self-starter? How is the person’s confidence? Can he or she perform basic tasks required of the potential for which you are hiring? Not all people can put their knowledge into action. Does the person demonstrate problem-solving skills? Ideally you want someone who can work well under pressure as well as strive to succeed.
  • Does the person work well within a group? Most healthcare offices must function as a closely-knit team to achieve the high-quality of service to which their patients have become accustomed. While individual initiative is a positive trait, being able to follow instructions and operate as part of a team is essential too.
  • Never disregard your first impression of an applicant. While an individual’s resume and interview will weigh heavily on your hiring decision, a first impression goes a long way. How did the person dress? How were his or her communication skills? Did the individual have a positive attitude? Was he or she on time? Each of these gives you an insight into the person and how or she may act in the future, so don’t ignore your first impression.

Healthcare Hiring Made Easy

Healthcare hiring does not have to be as complex as it is often made out to be. As long as you know what you are looking for in an applicant (which I recommend you take some time to figure out ahead of time or you could be missing out on excellent candidates), you know what mistakes to avoid in your hiring practices and you have a source of qualified applicants, you should have no problem meeting your urgent demand.

The People Link is a professional recruitment service specializing in finding and placing qualified healthcare candidates and allied healthcare professionals in positions throughout the United States. To learn more about our services please visit The People Link or call Mya at 888-773-0014 to obtain your free, no-obligation consultation.

Tuesday, November 15, 2016

How to Expedite Your Job Search

While looking for a new job can be an extremely frustrating experience, your efforts will be more quickly rewarded if you do a little preparation ahead of time. This doesn’t mean you need to spend all of your free-time updating your resume and scanning job sites for potential employers. Of course “pounding the pavement” does tend to speed the process along, however I’ve got a few tips to help you expedite your job search.

Really Take a Look at Why You’re Looking for Work

Has your existing job worn you out? Have you suddenly found yourself in desperate need of a change? Maybe you feel like you’ve fallen into a rut and are having trouble advancing your career. Perhaps you’ve been passed up for a promotion? Or maybe, you’re planning a move and simply need to find a new place to work? It could even be you simple want a change of environment and pace. You need to really take a look at why you are looking for work. Once you know why you’re looking for a new job, you will be able to figure out exactly what you want.

Figure Out Exactly What You Want

I know this may sound so simple I shouldn’t even need to mention it, but you’d be surprised how many people start looking for work before they have determined what they really want. I’m not necessarily talking about a job title or position, although that is important, I mean what do you want out of your new job? How do you want your new job to be different than your old job?
  • Do you want to work in a larger office with plenty of room for advancement or would you prefer a smaller office with more of a close-knit family feel?
  • Do you want a job where your employer encourages, and maybe even helps pay for and facilitate, continuing education classes?
  • Is professional advancement important to you?
  • Do you want or need specific hours?
  • Would you rather work close to home or are you open to a short commute?
  • What level of compensation are you looking to get? Do you have a specific range or minimum amount you seek?
  • What type of benefits do you want?

Determine Your One Defining Factor

Once you know why you are looking and what you want exactly, now it’s time to figure out what the one key factor is in determining whether or not you will accept an extended job offer. What is the one defining factor which will get you to accept or cause you to pass up an offer?
Only at this point will you be able to update your resume appropriately and truly begin your job search. Should you need assistance with writing a powerful resume or you are looking for a position in the healthcare industry, don’t hesitate to take advantage of the various job listings and other resources at your disposal.
The People Link is a professional recruitment service specializing in finding and placing qualified healthcare candidates in positions throughout the United States. If you are actively looking for work as a physical therapist, occupational therapist, speech language pathologist, nurse practitioner or dentist, please feel free to visit my website or contact me at 888-773-0014 for a free, no-obligation consultation.

Wednesday, June 29, 2016

Job Seeker Interview Tips You Need to Know

If you are in the market for a new job, it is important you know how to prepare for and what to do doing any interviews you may procure. While writing your resume may have seemed like the most daunting task, it is often just the first step in your job hunt and, in reality, is only used to get your foot in the door. Once you do that, your goal becomes selling yourself to a point where you receive one or more job offers.

Although people have different ideas on what actions they need to take to prepare for a job interview, here are some job seeker interview tips you need to know:

Do Your Research and Prep Work Ahead of Time

It is always best to know before you go. Research your potential employer. Find out what the business is all about. Understand how the position you are applying for fits in to the overall company goals and objectives. Learn a little about the individual who will be conducting your interview. These actions will help you familiarize yourself and enable you to answer interview questions more intelligently.

You should also take some time and figure out how you would answer some of the more common interview questions. You don’t have to memorize your answers, but simply formulate what you may want to say ahead of time if you are asked to:

  • “Tell me about yourself.” aka give a succinct overview of you as a professional
  • Explain what interests you most about the position
  • Talk about why you left or are planning to leave your last job
  • Explain why you would be the best candidate for the position
  • Tell the interviewer what you know about the company
  • Give examples of times you used the particular skills required of the job (e.g. problem solving, handling patient issues, dealing with customer complaints, overcoming work-related obstacles, etc.)
  • Express your career goals (be sure to include how the position fits into your goals)
  • Give the interviewer your desired salary range

Doing your research and prep work ahead of time will help you be more at ease and minimize your chances of getting thrown off guard during your interview.

Be Sure to Dress for Success

You always want to be sure to dress for success regardless of where you are interviewing. Professionalism is a quality most employers look for in potential employees and what you wear has a significant impact on how you are perceived. Those who dress professional and carry themselves well are generally taken as more serious applicants than those who don’t bother taking the time.

Arrive to Your Scheduled Interview on Time

Arriving late to a job interview is never a good idea. In fact, you’ll probably want to arrive at least 10-15 minutes ahead of time to check in, complete any additional paperwork and get yourself settled. Allow for traffic and unexpected delays on the way to your interview. As long as you factor these in, you’ll be on time and ready to go. It is also wise to go to the restroom, check your hair, makeup and clothes, use a breath mint as needed, and turn off your cell phone before you head into your interview. Just make sure you do each of these without making your interviewer wait.

Make a Great First Impression

People tend to make judgements quite quickly and trying to change a person’s impression of you later on is much more difficult than going the extra mile the first time around. This is why most people are well aware of the importance of making a good first impression with the individual doing their job interview. Unfortunately, what they often forget is all of the other people they meet along the way. Be friendly to each person you encounter. Say hello. Smile. Make eye contact. How you come across in those first few moments can mean the difference between you being given an offer and you not even being considered.

Do Your Best to Avoid Bad Habits

It is not uncommon for people to develop certain bad habits over time. In many cases, we may not even be aware of these habits or how they come across. Making a conscious effort to avoid habits like slouching down in your chair, mumbling, tapping your nails, playing with your hair, biting on a pen, crossing your arms in front of your chest or daydreaming. Focus on:

  • Sitting up straight
  • Maintaining eye contact
  • Smiling
  • Staying attentive
  • Nodding
  • Speaking clearly
  • Expressing interest
  • Making natural gestures

You want to come across naturally, comfortable and professional. Don’t let your bad habits ruin what could be a potentially great career move.

Don’t Be Afraid to Ask Questions

Asking questions during a job interviews is often taken as a sign as to whether or not an individual is interested in the position. It is for this reason most interviewers want the people they are interviewing to ask questions about the job, the company, the role they will play, how job performance will be measured, expectations and what the future of the organization may hold.

Don’t Sell Yourself Short

When doing a job interview, you cannot assume your resume will do all the talking and the individual most qualified for the job (which you hope is you) will receive an offer. When you go in for a job interview, it is up to you to sell yourself. Highlight your best qualities and qualifications, and make sure your interviewer knows why you’d be the best fit. Don’t sell yourself short. If you’ve got the skills for the job and you want the job, it is up to you to make the sale by getting the job offer.

Get Help Finding Your Ideal Job

The People Link is a professional recruitment service which specializes in finding and placing qualified healthcare candidates in positions throughout the U.S. If you are looking for a job in the healthcare industry, please visit our website to review our current job listings and the job seeker services we offer. You can also call 888-773-0014 today for a free, no-obligation job consultation.

Wednesday, June 8, 2016

The Importance of Checking References

Checking references is a vital part of the hiring process. While a candidate may look very good on paper, as most people will do what they can to highlight their positive qualities and make their resumes stand out, it is important to validate the information they provide.  In fact, one of the only ways an employer often has of verifying the employment history, experience and skills listed on a resume is through a reference check.

Failing to conduct reference checks could mean you and your company end up with employees who are unable to do the jobs they've been assigned, or who perform poorly, despite their ability to gloss through their initial interview.

How References Can Help Make Sure You're Getting a Good Candidate

Employers who want to make sure they are getting a good candidate should, at the very least:

  • Contact one reference towards the beginning of the recruitment process, so they know if they want to continue.
  • Follow up with a second reference prior to making an offer.
  • Contacting a third reference, if either of the two prior references brought into question the individual's work ethic or experience.

Be wary of fake referees. Sometimes people will list co-workers as previous employers to ensure they get a better review. Asking what the referee's relationship was with the candidate will help eliminate this problem. 

Types of Questions to Ask During a Reference Check

Knowing the right questions to ask during a reference check can determine whether you will learn anything about the applicant or simply have the wool pulled over your eyes. Consider each reference check as an opportunity to uncover the real story about the individual you are looking at hiring. Is this person reliable? What is his or her behavior like in the workplace? Does he or she have strong communication abilities? How are his or her decision-making skills? How does the person deal with time management?

In addition to gathering basic information to confirm dates of employment, duties performed, on-the-job performance and responsibilities held, you may also want to consider asking questions like:

  • What are the applicant's strengths and weaknesses?
  • Could the individual be held responsible for completing projects and meeting deadlines without extensive intervention?
  • How did the individual react after making a mistake?
  • What types of obstacles did the individual face on the job? What did he or she do to overcome these obstacles?
  • How does he or she operate as part of a team?
  • What was it like working with the person?
  • Why did he or she leave?
  • Would you work with the individual again if given the opportunity?
  • Is there anything else I should know about this person?

Keep in mind you want to elicit honest answers to your questions. Do not put words in the person's mouth as while this may give you a glowing review of the candidate, it could cover up more serious issues which should have been revealed during the reference check. 

Streamline the Hiring Process

The People Link is a professional recruitment service which specializes in finding and placing qualified healthcare candidates in positions throughout the U.S. If you are looking for top-of-the-line individuals to fill vacant positions, simply let us know what you are looking for and we can help you find it. We conduct interviews prior to sending you applicants, and help gather references on your behalf. To find out more about the services we offer, please visit our website or call Mya at 888-773-0014 for a free, no-obligation consultation. 

Sunday, May 29, 2016

Are You Hanging On To Employees Longer Than You Should?

Many employers may have a difficult time letting go of an employee, even when that employee has become extremely problematic, unproductive, incompetent at his or her job, or is the subject of extensive disciplinary actions. These employees are not interested in being part of the team. They simply generate chaos and hinder production. You can spot these employees because they don't respond to constructive feedback, tend to renege on agreements, refuse to take responsibility for their own actions and don't take others' needs into consideration.

What employers with dead weight do not often realize is holding on to such employees is not beneficial to them or their business. In actual fact, keeping these employees on does far more harm than good.

Reasons You May Be Hesitant to Let an Employee Go

It is not uncommon for a dead weight employee to try and make him- or herself appear irreplaceable or invaluable to the company where he or she works. Many times this makes it harder for a boss to identify dead weight and let the employee go.

Resolving this problem starts with looking at some of the reasons you may be hesitant to let an employee go:

  • The employee has been with your company for a very long time
  • The employee is a family member or friend
  • The employee has developed such a positive rapport with your clients, you're worried about the potential backlash
  • The employee has proprietary information you're worried will leak out
  • You can't imagine anyone else doing the employee's job
  • You're worried about the income you may lose
  • You are afraid of violating labor laws
  • You don't like confrontation
  • You've begun to second guess your decision

Let me tell you this with certainty, even if you feel terminating a dead weight employee may cost you in income, staff or clients, the exact opposite is probably true. Getting rid of a bad apple in the mix will usually improve conditions. At the very least, you will prevent ill-will amongst your staff, save yourself a lot of lost time and frustration, and even reduce the risk of losing good employees and clients.

Signs You Have An Employee Who Needs to Be Replaced

As long as you can identify a dead weight employee, you can take action to remedy the situation. Some of the most easily-spotted signs you have an employee who needs to be replaced includes:

  • Continual dishonesty and lies of commission or omission
  • Incompetence on the job, despite extensive training, coaching, practice and a reasonable amount of time for the employee to adjust and adapt
  • Flat out refusal to do the job or operate as a member of your team
  • Undependable; cannot be counted upon to be on-time, adhere to deadlines or keep commitments
  • Engages in unethical behavior such as: harassment, in-office bullying, or other activities in violation of your company's code of conduct

If you have an employee who fits into this category, it is likely he or she needs to be replaced.

Bringing In a Competent Replacement

Most employees are willing to work hard, be a contributing member of your team and help your business thrive. This should make it relatively easy to bring in a competent replacement for any dead weight employee you need to terminate. Once you have made the decision to free yourself of the bad apples, we are here to help.

The People Link is a professional recruitment service specializing in finding and placing qualified healthcare candidates in positions throughout the U.S. All you need to do is let us know what you are looking for and we can help you find it. To learn more about the various services we offer, please visit our website or call Mya at 888-773-0014 for a free, no-obligation consultation. 

Saturday, May 21, 2016

How to Spot Promise in a Potential Employee

Hiring can be a difficult task at times, particularly when you aren't 100 percent sure the characteristics you are looking for or the qualities you really seek. Although many employers would agree that hiring a skilled, qualified and experienced employee is a guaranteed bet, other factors must be considered. Keep in mind, the promise in a potential employee cannot necessarily be seen on his or her resume.

When it is your job to interview potential employees, day in and day out, you kind of develop a knack for being able to spot potential. Again, when I say potential, I'm not talking simply about which individual has the highest skill level or the most experience. What I'm referring to is being able to determine which of the potential employees you are interviewing is going to be of the greatest benefit to you and your company? Which individual will be willing to work the hardest, excel at the tasks he or she is given, and become part of your dedicated team? How do you spot these precious gems? What type of people do you want to avoid?

If you know how to spot promise in a potential employee, you'll have a much greater chance of being able to successfully staff your office, build your company up and ultimately succeed.

Signs You Have a Motivated Job Applicant

Spotting a motivated job applicant doesn't take much when you know the signs. Much of what will tell you whether an applicant is motivated or not is in what he or she says. Be careful not to overlook these key signs when doing job interviews, or you may miss out on potentially wonderful assets.

  • Expresses sincere interest in the company, what it does and how they fit in.
  • Talks about their own strengths and skills, and how this would help in aiding the company's expansion and success once they are brought on board.
  • Speaks about their motivation, i.e. why they got into this particular profession and the goals they would like to achieve (both personally and as part of your group).
  • Has a personal conviction about their potential position and willingness to do the tasks assigned.

What to Watch Out for During the Interview Process

Once you have reviewed a person's resume and determined he or she may be a potential candidate for a specific position within your company, your next step is to schedule an interview. Spotting promise during this interview is easy, so long as you know to watch out for these tell-tale signs:

  • Is the individual more concerned with the benefits he or she will be getting?
  • Is the individual talking a lot about time off? Schedules? Over-time?
  • Does he or she seem to have attention on what the bare minimum is to get paid?
  • Does the individual seem more interested in what he or she will get from the company, rather than what he or she can lend to its success?
  • Is the individual more interested in personal gain than providing an excellent service to the company and its public?

These are all potential signs an individual is less duty-motivated and not quite as team-oriented as you may want. What you want is to hire an employee who not only has integrity, personal conviction and takes pride in his or her own work, but one who realizes the success of the company is beneficial to all. Those individuals who are willing to work hard to contribute towards your company's growth are worth their weight in gold. Let the others go. They'll only pull you down in the long run.

Finding the Right Fit

Good employees do exist, if you know what to look for and where to look. The People Link is a professional recruitment service specializing in finding and placing qualified healthcare candidates in positions throughout the 50 states. To find out more about the services we offer, please visit our website or call 888-773-0014 for a free, no-obligation consultation.